Amaranth Grain

or

Bulk sold in 1 lb and 5 lb quantities

A native crop in Peru and cultivated by the Aztecs 8,000 years ago.  Amaranth is tall - often six feet – with broad green leaves, bright red or gold flowers.

Amaranth isn't technically a grain like oats, wheat, or rice. It's gluten-free. When ground its red "buds" can be ground as well for a red-tinged and very healthful grain.

Being extremely dense, amaranth is too heavy to be used by itself. It's best used with other grains for a lighter texture.

Amaranth's remarkable nutrition: It's higher in minerals, such as calcium, iron, phosphorous, and carotenoids, than most vegetables. High protein content: cup for cup, 28.1 grams of protein compared to the 26.3 grams in oats and 13.1 grams in rice.

Amaranth is a great source of lysine, an important amino acid with protein content comparable to that of milk, more easily digested; neither can be said of other grains. To support this positive aspect of amaranth, it also contains primary proteins called albumin and globulins, which, in comparison with the prolamins in wheat, are more soluble and digestible.

One cup of raw amaranth contains 15 milligrams of iron, while white rice contains only 1.5 milligrams. One cup of raw amaranth also contains 18 milligrams of fiber; in comparison, white rice contains 2.4 grams.

At 105% of the daily value per serving in manganese, yet few carbohydrates. High in calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium. Amaranth contains 6 to 10% oil, predominantly unsaturated, or around 77% unsaturated fatty acids, including linoleic acid, required for optimum nutrition. Not least in this list, amaranth is the only grain with documented vitamin C content.

Cooking
Amaranth is comparable to cooking pasta or rice: boil plenty of water (six cups of water per one cup of amaranth), measure the grain into it, cook and stir for 15 to 20 minutes, drain, rinse, and eat. 
Amaranth can be used as a thickener for sauces, soups, stews, and even jellies. Eaten as a snack, amaranth can have a light, nutty, or peppery-crunchy texture and flavor. Best of all, amaranth is even more nutritious than its true-grain counterparts.

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